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Jan 23, 2018

Whether you first heard of the idea of "improv" from a studio that went up in your hometown, from a rather recognizable televised comedy game that saw popularity in the last ten or fifteen years, or possibly even from conversations with performing arts majors on college campuses, most people will have some understanding of what improvisation means. The form has grown in recognition and application in the last 25 years, but dates back as far as some early 20th century vaudeville shows, or even the Commedia dell'Arte of 18th century Italy.

Referring to it as "improv acting" may be a misnomer, however, as in many modern instances, there may not even be 'acting' involved. Improv skills and their approaches to interpersonal communication have found new applications in team building exercises, speech and behavioral therapy, both elementary and adult education. Of course, there is still the obvious association with quick thinking, listening skills, speaking in public, and everything else you might look to develop in order to "say yes" to any offers you're presented with. And yes, despite the fact that it appears so off-the-cuff, there's actually a rather sophisticated structure to improv.

We're joined for the conversation by Julie and Matt, players from the Hartford, Connecticut-based Sea Tea Improv, as well as other improv comedy groups from around the country!